0

WHY THIS MATTERS IN BRIEF

Everything you watch through a screen is just a collection of digital pixels, and as AI gets better at generating synthetic content real human performers could be less relevant …

 

Love the Exponential Future? Join our XPotential Community, future proof yourself with courses from XPotential Universityconnect, watch a keynote, or browse my blog.

As I continue to watch the rise of new virtual artists and influencers, from Japan to the USA, like Lil Miquela and many others, K-Pop girl band aespa has announced that it’s adding a new member to its ranks named “ae-KARINA.” But there’s something different about this particular band member. She’s an entirely virtual, computer generated avatar, not a real singer like her fellow band members.

 

RELATED
Google Stadia's AI lets game developers instantly change the style of their games

 

The band, licensed under SM Entertainment, confirmed that its work will feature both real life and “virtual” band members. The backstory of ae-KARINA says she’s 20 years old, from Korea — and the digital counterpart to the band’s IRL band member Karina, also a 20 year old from Korea.

 

See the newest band member being introduced

 

The pair reportedly have “various skills including vocals, rap, and dance,” according to English-language k-pop site Soompi.

 

RELATED
Nvidia's new VR HQ is a peak into the workplace of 2025

 

A new video uploaded by the site introduces the virtual avatar and discusses how the various band members connect with her via social media. It’s not clear who will be running the virtual band member’s accounts.

The South Korean entertainment industry is no stranger to putting a digital avatar on stage. For instance, the band K/DA is entirely virtual and was created by Riot Games, the developer behind the popular online battle game “League of Legends.”

 

RELATED
Facebook's DeepFovea tool reduces VR rendering resources by upto 99 percent

 

Hatsune Miku, an entirely computer-generated “Vocaloid” powered by a Japanese media company, also was set to perform at Coachella this year, but as you may have heard, basically every major music event, including Coachella, was cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic. And while that’s a crying shame who knows, maybe next year some of these virtual influencers will forgo appearing at live events altogether and instead attend some of the new spectacular mixed reality events, like League of Legends Worlds event that I wrote about recently, instead.

Source: AllKPop

About author

Matthew Griffin

Matthew Griffin, described as “The Adviser behind the Advisers” and a “Young Kurzweil,” is the founder and CEO of the World Futures Forum and the 311 Institute, a global Futures and Deep Futures consultancy working between the dates of 2020 to 2070, and is an award winning futurist, and author of “Codex of the Future” series. Regularly featured in the global media, including AP, BBC, Bloomberg, CNBC, Discovery, RT, Viacom, and WIRED, Matthew’s ability to identify, track, and explain the impacts of hundreds of revolutionary emerging technologies on global culture, industry and society, is unparalleled. Recognised for the past six years as one of the world’s foremost futurists, innovation and strategy experts Matthew is an international speaker who helps governments, investors, multi-nationals and regulators around the world envision, build and lead an inclusive, sustainable future. A rare talent Matthew’s recent work includes mentoring Lunar XPrize teams, re-envisioning global education and training with the G20, and helping the world’s largest organisations envision and ideate the future of their products and services, industries, and countries. Matthew's clients include three Prime Ministers and several governments, including the G7, Accenture, Aon, Bain & Co, BCG, Credit Suisse, Dell EMC, Dentons, Deloitte, E&Y, GEMS, Huawei, JPMorgan Chase, KPMG, Lego, McKinsey, PWC, Qualcomm, SAP, Samsung, Sopra Steria, T-Mobile, and many more.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *