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WHY THIS MATTERS IN BRIEF

As these sensors become more powerful one day we’ll be able to visualise the stress crops are under at scale and intervene to save them.

 

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Today, thanks in part to climate change, plants everywhere are under a lot of stress which can not only reduce crop yields and stunt their growth, and in extreme circumstances it can kill them. While organisations like DARPA in the US are trying to find new ways to bring plants back from the dead and revive them there’s no doubt that being able to measure and monitor the amount of stress plants are under would be useful, and now scientists in the US have found a way to do just that.

 

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Plant biologists have long sought a deeper understanding of foundational processes involving kinases, enzymes that catalyze key biological activities in proteins. Analysing the processes underlying kinases in plants takes on greater urgency in today’s environment increasingly altered by climate warming.

Certain “SnRK2” kinases are essential since they are known to be activated in response to drought conditions, triggering the protective closure of small pores on leaf surfaces known as stoma. These pores allow carbon dioxide to enter leaves, but plants also lose more than 90 percent of their water by evaporation through them. Pore opening and closing functions help optimize growth and drought tolerance in response to changes in the environment.

Now, plant biologists at the University of California San Diego have developed a new nano-sensor that allows researchers to monitor SnRK2 protein kinase activity in live plant cells. The SnRK2 activity sensor, or “SNACS,” is described in the journal eLife.

 

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Prior efforts to dissect protein kinase activities involved a tedious process of grinding up plant tissues and measuring kinase activities through cell extracts. More than 100 leaves were required per experiment for analyses of the stomatal pore forming “guard cells.” SNACS now allows researchers to analyse changes in real time as they happen.

 

 

For the first time we can see stress in plants.

 

“Previously, it was not possible to investigate time-resolved SnRK2 activity in living plant cells,” said Biological Sciences Distinguished Professor Julian Schroeder, a member of the Section of Cell and Developmental Biology and senior author of the new paper. “The SNACS sensor reports direct real-time visualisation of SnRK2 kinase activity in single live plant cells or tissues.”

The new biosensor is already paying dividends. The researchers describe using SNACS to provide new evidence about longstanding questions about SnRK2 and foundational interactions with carbon dioxide. The researchers show that abscisic acid, a drought stress hormone in plants, activates the kinases, but that elevated carbon dioxide does not, resolving a recently debated question.

 

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“Our findings could benefit researchers investigating environmental stress responses in plants and analysing how different signalling pathways interact with one another in plant cells,” said Yohei Takahashi, a UC San Diego project scientist and co-corresponding author of the study. “The ability to investigate time-resolved SnRK2 kinase regulation in live plants is of particular importance for understanding environmental stress responses of plant cells.”

The new nanosensor was developed using an approach pioneered by the late UC San Diego Professor Roger Tsien, in part for which he was awarded a Nobel Prize.

About author

Matthew Griffin

Matthew Griffin, described as “The Adviser behind the Advisers” and a “Young Kurzweil,” is the founder and CEO of the World Futures Forum and the 311 Institute, a global Futures and Deep Futures consultancy working between the dates of 2020 to 2070, and is an award winning futurist, and author of “Codex of the Future” series. Regularly featured in the global media, including AP, BBC, Bloomberg, CNBC, Discovery, RT, Viacom, and WIRED, Matthew’s ability to identify, track, and explain the impacts of hundreds of revolutionary emerging technologies on global culture, industry and society, is unparalleled. Recognised for the past six years as one of the world’s foremost futurists, innovation and strategy experts Matthew is an international speaker who helps governments, investors, multi-nationals and regulators around the world envision, build and lead an inclusive, sustainable future. A rare talent Matthew’s recent work includes mentoring Lunar XPrize teams, re-envisioning global education and training with the G20, and helping the world’s largest organisations envision and ideate the future of their products and services, industries, and countries. Matthew's clients include three Prime Ministers and several governments, including the G7, Accenture, Aon, Bain & Co, BCG, Credit Suisse, Dell EMC, Dentons, Deloitte, E&Y, GEMS, Huawei, JPMorgan Chase, KPMG, Lego, McKinsey, PWC, Qualcomm, SAP, Samsung, Sopra Steria, T-Mobile, and many more.

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