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WHY THIS MATTERS IN BRIEF

Graphene is a wonder material that could revolutionise almost every industry on the planet – if we can find ways to manufacture it easily and cheaply…

 

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The general public knows the chemical compound of carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and because of its global warming effect. However, carbon dioxide can also be a useful raw material for chemical reactions, and now in a first a team at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany have reported in the ChemSusChem journal that they’ve managed to use carbon dioxide as a raw material to produce the wonder material graphene, that, if we could find a way to manufacture it easily and cheaply, such as making it from common trash, which happened recently, would revolutionise every industry from communications and energy through to computing and healthcare.

 

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The combustion of fossil fuels produces energy for electricity, heat and mobility, but it also leads to an increase of the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and therefore is a major contributor to global warming. Interrupting this cycle therefore is what motivates scientists to search for alternative energy sources but also for alternative uses of carbon dioxide, and one possibility on the table could be to use the noxious gas as an inexpensive raw material to help synthesise valuable materials.

One of these examples can be found in nature where photosynthesis in plants, the combination of light, water and carbon dioxide creates biomass – thus closing the natural material cycle. In this process, it is the job of the metal-based enzyme RuBisCo to absorb the carbon dioxide from the air and make it usable for the further chemical reactions in the plant.

Inspired by this metal enzyme-based natural conversion, researchers at KIT are now presenting a process in which the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide together with hydrogen gas is converted directly into graphene at temperatures of up to 1,000 degrees Celsius with the help of special catalytic metals.

 

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Graphene is the 2D form of the chemical element carbon, which has interesting electrical properties and is therefore an option for new future electronic components. Its discovery and workability in 2004 led to worldwide, intensive research and earned the discoverers, Andre Geim and Konstanin Novoselov, the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2010. The two removed the graphene manually from a block of graphite using tape.

Several working groups at KIT have collaborated to present a method in the ChemSusChem journal for separating graphene from carbon dioxide and hydrogen by means of a metal catalyst.

“If the metal surface exhibits the correct ratio of copper and palladium, the conversion of carbon dioxide to graphene will take place directly in a simple one-step process,” explains the head of the study, Professor Mario Ruben, from the Institute of Nanotechnology (INT) and the Institute for Inorganic Chemistry (AOC) at KIT.

 

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In further experiments the researchers were even able to produce graphene several layers thick, which could be interesting for possible applications in batteries, electronic components or filter materials. The working group’s next research goal is to form functioning electronic components from the graphene thus obtained. Carbon materials such as graphene and magnetic molecules could be the building blocks for future quantum computers, which enable ultra-fast and energy-efficient calculations but are not based on the binary logic of today’s computers.

About author

Matthew Griffin

Matthew Griffin, described as “The Adviser behind the Advisers” and a “Young Kurzweil,” is the founder and CEO of the World Futures Forum and the 311 Institute, a global Futures and Deep Futures consultancy working between the dates of 2020 to 2070, and is an award winning futurist, and author of “Codex of the Future” series. Regularly featured in the global media, including AP, BBC, CNBC, Discovery, RT, and Viacom, Matthew’s ability to identify, track, and explain the impacts of hundreds of revolutionary emerging technologies on global culture, industry and society, is unparalleled. Recognised for the past six years as one of the world’s foremost futurists, innovation and strategy experts Matthew is an international speaker who helps governments, investors, multi-nationals and regulators around the world envision, build and lead an inclusive, sustainable future. A rare talent Matthew’s recent work includes mentoring Lunar XPrize teams, re-envisioning global education and training with the G20, and helping the world’s largest organisations envision and ideate the future of their products and services, industries, and countries. Matthew's clients include three Prime Ministers and several governments, including the G7, Accenture, Bain & Co, BCG, Credit Suisse, Dell EMC, Dentons, Deloitte, E&Y, GEMS, Huawei, JPMorgan Chase, KPMG, Lego, McKinsey, PWC, Qualcomm, SAP, Samsung, Sopra Steria, T-Mobile, and many more.

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