Mysterious hypersonic SR-72 demonstrator spotted in California

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WHY THIS MATTERS IN BRIEF

  • Hypersonic platforms, from autonomous aircraft to “carrier killers” and missiles, so it’s inevitable that over the next five or so years sightings are going to increase


 

Lockheed Martin’s Advanced Development Program (ADP), better known as “Skunk Works,” might be further along in the development of their hypersonic SR-72 than the company has previously let on. A proposed hypersonic reconnaissance and strike aircraft, the SR-72 is the successor to the infamous cold war SR-71 Blackbird, which was retired by the USAF back in 1998. Earlier this year in June the company announced that they were confident about starting production of the SR-72 “very soon,” and now a source has told Aviation Week that they spotted a small demonstrator aircraft landing at Skunk Works facilities in Palmdale, California.

 

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The reported sighting corresponds with announcements from Lockheed’s executives who recently said that they were working on a combined-cycle engine that uses elements of both a turbine and a scramjet to achieve hypersonic speeds, something they tested with partner Aerojet Rocketdyne between 2013 and 2017. Two combined-cycle engines are planned to power the SR-72, which is designed to be about the same size of the SR-71 and could achieve first flight in the late 2020s.

While the main aim of the program is to create an unmanned version of the SR-72 an “optionally piloted” Flight Research Vehicle (FRV) is also apparently in the works to help flight test the SR-72 design. Initially the FRV will be about the size of an F-22 and use a single combined-cycle engine for propulsion, and its development is expected to begin next year with first flights as soon as 2020. Leading up to the FRV though it’s only natural that Lockheed would be conducting ground and flight tests on even smaller demonstrators, which might explain the small aircraft that was reportedly spotted landing at their facilities in California.

 

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According to the source one such technology demonstrator, believed to be an unmanned subscale aircraft, was observed flying into the US Air Force’s Plant 42 at Palmdale, where Skunk Works is headquartered. The vehicle, which was noted landing in the early hours at an unspecified date in late July, was seen with two T-38 escorts. Lockheed Martin declined to comment directly on the sighting.

In addition to the alleged sighting, Orlando Carvalho, Executive Vice President of Aeronautics at Lockheed Martin, referenced the SR-72 program at this week’s SAE International Aerotech Congress and Exhibition in Fort Worth, Texas.

“Although I can’t go into specifics, let us just say the Skunk Works team in Palmdale, California, is doubling down on our commitment to speed,” he said, going on to say, “Hypersonics is like stealth. It is a disruptive technology and will enable various platforms to operate at two to three times the speed of the original Blackbird… Security classification guidance will only allow us to say the speed is greater than Mach 5.”

 

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With classified military aircraft development, it has historically been the case that systems and flight testing begin years before details of the program are made public. Such was the case with the original SR-71, as well as the F-117 Nighthawk and the B-2 Spirit stealth aircraft, and now, the fact that Skunk Works is letting some information slip about the SR-72 program, combined with the possible subscale demonstrator sighting in Palmdale, it looks like the appearance of the Blackbird’s hypersonic successor is only a matter of time.

About author

Matthew Griffin

Matthew Griffin, Futurist and Founder of the 311 Institute is described as “The Adviser behind the Advisers.” Among other things Matthew keeps busy helping the world’s largest smartphone manufacturers ideate the next five generations of smartphones, and what comes beyond, the world’s largest chip makers envision the next twenty years of intelligent machines, and is helping Europe’s largest energy companies re-invent energy generation, transmission and retail.

Recognised in 2013, 2015 and 2016 as one of Europe’s foremost futurists, innovation and strategy experts Matthew is an award winning author, entrepreneur and international speaker who has been featured on the BBC, Discovery and other outlets. Working hand in hand with accelerators, investors, governments, multi-nationals and regulators around the world Matthew helps them envision the future and helps them transform their industries, products and go to market strategies, and shows them how the combination of new, democratised, powerful emerging technologies are helping accelerate cultural, industrial and societal change.

Matthew’s clients include Accenture, Bain & Co, Bank of America, Blackrock, Booz Allen Hamilton, Boston Consulting Group, Dell EMC, Dentons, Deutsche Bank, Deloitte, Deutsche Bank, Du Pont, E&Y, Fidelity, Goldman Sachs, HPE, Huawei, JP Morgan Chase, KPMG, Lloyds Banking Group, McKinsey & Co, PWC, Qualcomm, Rolls Royce, SAP, Samsung, Schroeder’s, Sequoia Capital, Sopra Steria, UBS, the UK’s HM Treasury, the USAF and many others.

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